All Items

Special Indicators:

Expected Fees Landfill Banned Item Hazard Consider Changing Up Special Recycling
  1. Aerosol cans, not empty, toxics

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  2. Ammunition

    Landfill banned item
    • Local gun shop

      Contact your local gun shop. Some gun shops will accept old ammunition and dispose of it for you.

  3. Asbestos, asbestos-containing materials

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • Asbestos is a hazardous materials (both friable and non-friable) and must be handled and disposed of carefully. Contact the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources (802-863-7236, or toll-free in Vermont 800-439-8550) for a list of licensed asbestos abatement contractors. Contact the Vermont Department of Health Lead and Asbestos Program (802-865-7784 or 800-439-8550) for assistance with health concerns about asbestos.

      (802) 863-7236

  4. Aseptic cartons and containers (tetrapak, coated gable-top cartons for milk, juice, broth, etc.)

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  5. Asphalt shingles, new, reusable

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  6. Asphalt shingles, nonreusable

    Expect fees
  7. Batteries, household, automotive, lead acid (rechargeable and single-use, alkaline, lithium, button cell, car, etc.)

    Landfill banned item
  8. Bleach and bleach-based products

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  9. Boxboard

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  10. Broken fluorescent bulbs and CFLs

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  11. Building materials

    Expect fees
  12. Caps and lids, plastic, loose, greater than 2" diameter

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  13. Caps and lids, plastic, loose, less than 2" diameter

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  14. Catalogs

    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  15. CD covers, jewel cases

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  16. Cell phones

    Landfill banned item
  17. Ceramic toilets, sinks, and fixtures

    Expect fees
  18. Chip and popcorn bags

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  19. Christmas trees, real

    • Some transfer stations accept leaf and yard waste. Follow the link to learn more and find a drop-off near you. Leaf and yard waste can also be composted safely if you have the space to do it in your yard.

    • Public Works Facility

      Some public works facilities accept clean wood waste and/or stumps

    • Some transfer stations in Vermont accept stumps and clean wood debris from landscaping activites.

    • Vermont Compost is a commercial composting facility. They accept food scraps at their drop off site in Montpelier and sell compost for domestic use.

      (802) 223-6049

  20. Clean wood (natural wood, stumps, roots, lumber that has never been painted, stained, or treated)

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  21. Cleaning products, hazardous (oven and toilet cleaners, drain openers, etc.)

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  22. Concrete and masonry

    Expect fees
  23. Construction and demolition debris

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  24. Covid-19 Home Test Kits

    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  25. Dimensional lumber, wood boards

    Expect fees
  26. Egg cartons, paper

    Landfill banned item
  27. Egg cartons, plastic

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  28. Egg cartons, styrofoam

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  29. Eyeglasses

    Expect fees
    • Some items may be donated to local organizations or groups. Check with local organizations or consider posting your items on Front Porch Forum.

    • Lion's Club accepts Eyeglasses for donation. There is an eyeglasses donation box in Berlin Optical Expressions at the Berlin Mall.

      (802) 476-6955

    • Optometrist

      Check with your eye doctor to see if they will take your old glasses for donation or recycling.

    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  30. Flower pots, plant pots, ceramic or clay

    Expect fees
    • Some items may be donated to local organizations or groups. Check with local organizations or consider posting your items on Front Porch Forum.

    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  31. Flower pots, plant pots, plastic (non-black)

    Expect fees
    • Some items may be donated to local organizations or groups. Check with local organizations or consider posting your items on Front Porch Forum.

    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  32. Food for donation

    • There are a number of organizations that accept food donations. Please contact the organizations beforehand. When donating food, it is important to remember that the donation is for human consumption and needs to be handled accordingly. If food looks or smells bad, is moldy, or has damaged packaging do not donate it – compost it!

  33. Food grade cooking oil

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  34. Food scraps, food waste

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  35. Furniture, couches, sofas, recliners, etc.

    Expect fees
  36. Gift wrap, metallic, foil, shiny, sparkle, coated

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  37. Gift wrap, wrapping paper, plain only

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  38. Glass Bottles and Jars, Broken

    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  39. Glassware and ceramics

    Expect fees
    • Some items may be donated to local organizations or groups. Check with local organizations or consider posting your items on Front Porch Forum.

    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  40. Junk mail

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  41. Lead paint chips

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  42. Lighting fixtures

    Expect fees
  43. Magazines

    Landfill banned item
    • Local schools (for art projects)

      Contact your local schools.

    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  44. Masks, Face

    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  45. Medical waste

    • Local hospital

      Contact your local hospital. Many hospitals have medication drop boxes and sharps disposal bins.

  46. Medications, prescriptions, and pharmaceutical drugs and pills

  47. Metal cans

    Landfill banned item
  48. Metal roofing and siding

    Expect fees
  49. Motor oil

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  50. Newspaper

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  51. Packing materials: air pillows, bubble wrap

    Expect fees
    • Office/Mailing stores

      Check with your local office and/or mailing stores to see if they will accept packing materials for reuse.

    • Shipping businesses

      Contact your local shipping businesses to see if they accept these materials.

    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  52. Paint and primers, stains (architectural), deck and concrete sealers, clear finishes (oil-based, latex, varnish, shellac), labelled in original cans

    Landfill banned item
  53. Paper

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  54. Paper bags

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  55. Phone books

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  56. Pizza boxes

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  57. Poisons, pesticides, insecticides, fungicides

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  58. Prescription pill, vitamin, and supplement bottles, less than 2"

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  59. Rags (clean ripped, torn, stained, unusable clothing & textiles)

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  60. Receipts

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  61. Sheetrock, drywall, and gypsum board

    Expect fees
  62. Shredded paper (in clear bag)

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • You can dispose of these items in your regular recycling.

  63. Skis, snowboards, boots and poles

    Expect fees
  64. Solvents (paint thinner, laquer thinner, acetone)

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
  65. Styrofoam peanuts

    Expect fees
    • Shipping businesses

      Contact your local shipping businesses to see if they accept these materials.

    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  66. Tape dispenser and cores

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  67. Trees, logs, stumps, and roots

    Expect fees
  68. Tyvek

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

    • Tyvek Recycle

      Mail Tyvek to: Tyvek Recycle, 337A Industrial Drive, Petersburg, VA 23803. For info: 804-518-2930 ask for Tyvek Recycles.

      (804) 518-2930

  69. Untreated wood and pallets

    Expect fees
  70. Vape pens

    • Vape company

      Contact the manufacturer for recycling options.

  71. Warmgel heat pack, hand and toe warmers

    Expect fees
    • You can dispose of this item in your regular trash

  72. Wheel chairs

    • Med Shed

      Raymond and Sue Toolan run The Med Shed, a voluntary system that acquires and loans used medical equipment for community members at no cost.

      sylak@comcast.net

      (802) 229-0093

  73. Windows and doors

  74. Yard waste - leaves, grass clippings, brush, branches & limbs under 1"

    Expect fees
    Landfill banned item
    • Some transfer stations accept leaf and yard waste. Follow the link to learn more and find a drop-off near you. Leaf and yard waste can also be composted safely if you have the space to do it in your yard.

    • Some transfer stations in Vermont accept stumps and clean wood debris from landscaping activites.


Hazards you should be careful with

  • Household Hazardous Waste

    Hazard waste symbols

    Household Hazardous Waste includes many common products that are poisonous, flammable, or toxic. These substances are harmful to humans, wildlife, and the environment and are banned from the landfill. Look for warning words like Caution, Danger, Warning, and Flammable. Make sure to keep these items cool, dry, and out of reach of children and animals. Never pour them down the drain or outside.

    For a fee, Residents in CVSWMD’s member towns can dispose of these items at our annual household hazardous waste collections. Vermont residents can also dispose of most of these items year-round at the Chittenden environmental depot. 

    • Aerosol cans, not empty, toxics
    • Ammonia
    • Antifreeze, coolant, and glycol
    • Automotive fluids - transmission, gear, crankcase, and motor oil
    • Bleach and bleach-based products
    • Broken fluorescent bulbs and CFLs
    • Cleaning products, hazardous (oven and toilet cleaners, drain openers, etc.)
    • Fertilizers, chemical
    • Flammable liquids
    • Fuel and fuel mixes
    • Gasoline and gas/oil mixtures
    • Hydraulic fluids
    • Kerosene
    • Mercury (liquid, loose, broken mercury-containing products)
    • Mothballs
    • Motor oil
    • Oil filters
    • Paint (automotive, non-architectural, not household)
    • Poisons, pesticides, insecticides, fungicides
    • Solvents (paint thinner, laquer thinner, acetone)
  • Mercury

    mercury thermostats

    Mercury is a shiny, silver liquid that can evaporate into a colorless, odorless vapor. It is harmful to humans and wildlife, and is found in many products including fluorescent bulbs, old thermostats, and thermometers. Handle these items with care to avoid releasing the mercury and poisoning yourself, others, and the environment – these items should never go in the trash. You can dispose of unbroken fluorescent bulbs at many places in Vermont – find a location near you here: Vermont – Lamp Recycle. Mercury thermostats are covered by a Vermont state EPR program and are free to dispose of; bring them to a hazardous waste facility or to CVSWMD’s Additional Recyclable Collection Center (ARCC). Other devices containing mercury can also be recycled at CVSWMD’s ARCC – fees apply. Learn more about mercury devices here. 

    Broken fluorescent bulbs should be handled carefully, and should be brought to a hazardous waste collection or a hazardous waste facility 

    • Broken fluorescent bulbs and CFLs
    • Fluorescent and CFL bulbs, lamps and tubes
    • Light bulbs, fluorescent
    • Mercury thermostats, unbroken
    • Mercury-containing devices, unbroken (thermometers, switches, relays, sensors)
  • E-waste

    E-Stack

    Electronic waste is banned from the landfill because it contains heavy metals and toxins; and has valuable recyclable components. Some electronic waste, specifically: TV's, computers, desktop printers, hard drives and computer peripherals like mice, keyboards and computer speakers are covered by Vermont state Extended Producer Responsibility programs and are free to recycle; fees apply for other electronic waste. Bring E-waste to CVSWMD’s Additional Recyclables Collection Center (ARCC), or find a recycling location here.

    • Computer monitors, any type - CRTs, flat-panel, LCD, and plasma displays
    • Computer peripherals - mouse, keyboards, scanners, external hard drives, modems, routers, computer speakers
    • Computers, desktops, laptops, notebooks, and netbooks
    • Personal electronics (GPS Units, cameras, Mp3 players, etc.)
    • Printers, desktop
    • Televisions, TVs, CRTs, flat-panel, LCD, and plasma displays, tablets
  • Batteries

    batteries

    Batteries are banned from the landfill in Vermont. Some, including batteries embedded in rechargeable electronic devices, can catch fire and explode if handled or stored improperly. Tape the terminal ends of used household batteries with clear packing tape, and bring them to a collection center to be recycled for free through Vermont's Extended Producer Responsibility program, Call2Recycle.

    • Batteries, household, automotive, lead acid (rechargeable and single-use, alkaline, lithium, button cell, car, etc.)
    • Batteries, lithium-ion, damaged or swollen
    • Cell phones
    • Computers, desktops, laptops, notebooks, and netbooks
    • Covid-19 Home Test Kits
    • Hand and power tools
    • iPods, MP3 and music players
    • Vacuum cleaners
  • Smoke detectors

    smoke detector

    Some smoke detectors contain a small amount of radioactive material called americium 241 (am-er-ish'-ee-um). Look on the back of the unit for the designation Am 241. Some dual function alarms, for smoke and carbon monoxide detection, also contain americium 241. Single purpose Carbon monoxide (CO) detectors do not use radioactive substances. In Vermont, smoke and CO detectors that do not contain non-removable batteries can be trashed, or you may choose to recycle them and keep them out of the landfill by bringing them to the ARCC (fees apply). Smoke detectors can be recycled at the ARCC

     

     

    • Smoke detectors
  • Flammable or Explosive

    flammable/explosive symbols

    This item is flammable or explosive and must be handled carefully and disposed of properly.

    • Ammunition
    • Fertilizers, chemical
    • Fireworks and explosives
    • Flammable liquids
    • Fuel and fuel mixes
    • Gasoline and gas/oil mixtures
    • Helium tanks, 20 pound size
    • Kerosene
    • Motor oil
    • Propane tanks
    • Rags, oily
    • Solvents (paint thinner, laquer thinner, acetone)
  • Asbestos

    Asbestos is a hazardous materials (both friable and non-friable) and must be handled and disposed of carefully. It was used in some types of building materials and can be dangerous if disturbed during construction and demolition projects. Learn more about the dangers of asbestos exposure here.  

    Contact the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources (802)-863-7236, or toll-free in Vermont 800-439-8550) for a list of licensed asbestos abatement contractors or find an asbestos contractor here. Contact the Vermont Department of Health Lead and Asbestos Program (802-865-7784 or 800-439-8550) for assistance with health concerns about asbestos.

     

    • Asbestos, asbestos-containing materials

Special Instructions

  • 2x2 Rule

    Objects smaller than 2 x 2 inches and larger than 2 x 2 feet should not go in the blue bin.

    • Beer bottle caps
    • Caps and lids, metal, less than 2"
    • Caps and lids, plastic, attached to recyclable container
    • Plastic bins and totes
    • Plastic containers, bottles, and jugs (non-black)
    • Prescription pill, vitamin, and supplement bottles, greater than 2"
    • Tape dispenser and cores
  • Foil

    Collect and ball up clean aluminum foil until it is at least 2 x 2 inches (approx. the size of a tennis ball) in size before recycling it in the blue bin. Make sure it's not covered in food or it will attract pests.

    • Aluminum cans, pie plates, and foil
  • Safer Choices - Cleaning Products

    Third Party Certifications

    Some cleaning products contain chemicals that can be harmful to human and environmental health. Look for third party certifications from groups like the Environmental Working Group (EWG) and EPA Safer Choice. Learn more about how to reduce toxics in your home here. We also have recipes for non-toxic cleaning solutions available on our website.

    • Aerosol cans, not empty, toxics
    • Ammonia
    • Bleach and bleach-based products
    • Cleaning products, hazardous (oven and toilet cleaners, drain openers, etc.)
    • Pump heads and spray triggers
  • Reduce Your Use – Architectural Paints and Stains

    Plan a paint job in order to buy only what you need. Unused architectural paint and stain can be recycled all around Vermont. Find a paint recycling location here. Empty paint cans can go in the trash or recycling.

    • Paint and primers, stains (architectural), deck and concrete sealers, clear finishes (oil-based, latex, varnish, shellac), labelled in original cans
    • Paint cans, empty, metal
    • Paint cans, empty, plastic
  • Reduce Your Use – Cleaners

    safer cleaning

    Many household cleaners contain chemicals that can be harmful to human and environmental health. You can make safe cleaning supplies out of household ingredients like baking soda and white vinegar. When buying, look for third party certifications from groups like the Environmental Working Group (EWG) and EPA Safer Choice. Learn more about how to reduce toxics in your home and choose safer cleaning supplies

    • Aerosol cans, not empty, toxics
    • Ammonia
    • Bleach and bleach-based products
    • Cleaning products, hazardous (oven and toilet cleaners, drain openers, etc.)
    • Solvents (paint thinner, laquer thinner, acetone)
  • Reduce Your Use – Poisons

    Poison

    Poisons (pesticides, herbicides, fungicides) can be dangerous for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. Reduce your use of poisons by controlling conditions to discourage pests and look into Integrated Pest Management Practices (IPM). Store unused poisons away from children and water sources, and make sure to dispose of them at a household hazardous waste collection or hazardous waste facility.

    • Fertilizers, chemical
    • Poisons, pesticides, insecticides, fungicides
  • Reduce Your Use – Mercury

    CFLs

    Fluorescent lamps contain mercury (Hg) which can escape and poison people, wildlife, and the environment. Safer alternatives to mercury lamps include LED bulbs, which also use less energy. When buying thermometers or thermostats, look for electronic models that do not contain mercury.

    • Broken fluorescent bulbs and CFLs
    • Fluorescent and CFL bulbs, lamps and tubes
    • Light bulbs, fluorescent
    • Mercury thermostats, unbroken
    • Mercury-containing devices, unbroken (thermometers, switches, relays, sensors)
  • Caps and lids

    Keep caps & lids on plastic bottles (after rinsing and drying), and put into blue bin recycling. Loose plastic lids are too small to be recycled at recycling facilities and become contamination in the glass.

    • Caps and lids, metal, less than 2"
    • Caps and lids, plastic, attached to recyclable container
    • Plastic bottles and jugs
  • Paper

    Use both sides before recycling. Shredded paper (uncoated only) can also be added to compost as browns.

    • Gift wrap, wrapping paper, plain only
    • Paper
  • Packing Materials

     

     

    Some office or mailing stores will take packing materials for reuse. Call your local store to find out. They do not want hard blocks of Styrofoam, but may accept packing peanuts. The ARCC will take stretchy plastic, but not Styrofoam, packing peanuts or paper.

    • Packing materials: air pillows, bubble wrap
    • Styrofoam blocks and packaging
    • Styrofoam peanuts
  • Paper, shredded

    Shredded paper must be recycled in a clear, tied bag. It is the ONLY blue bin recyclable that should be bagged. Shredded paper can also be added to compost as browns.

    • Documents for shredding
    • Shredded paper (in clear bag)
  • Pizza boxes

    Pizza boxes can be recycled, but they must be free of food residue. A bit of grease is okay.

    • Pizza boxes
  • Plastic bags

    Make sure plastic bags and recyclable plastic films (LDPE #2 and #4) are clean and dry prior to recycling at a participating plastic bag drop-off site or at CVSWMD’S Additional Recyclable Collection Center (ARCC). We encourage you to reuse plastic bags and to switch to using reusable bags instead.

    The following plastic film can be recycled (must be stretchy, not crinkly):

    • ​Produce bags (not compostable)
    • Bread bags (no paper, not crinkly)
    • Dry cleaning bags
    • Carry-out bags
    • Case wrap
    • Stretch film
    • Newspaper bags
    • Ziplocs and "baggies" food storage bags
    • Product overwrap (plastic wrap for toilet paper, etc)
    • Packing materials: air pillows, bubble wrap
    • Plastic bags, stretchy plastic film
    • Ziploc food storage plastic bags
  • Styrofoam

     

    Styrofoam is not recyclable in Vermont. Styrofoam peanuts can be reused in packaging or returned to certain shipping businesses. Sometimes stores will take back styrofoam packaging. Use alternatives when possible (e.g. reusable cups/containers instead of styrofoam cups/containers).

    • Styrofoam blocks and packaging
    • Styrofoam peanuts
  • Textiles

     

    Consider turning old textiles into napkins, face masks, or rags. Mend, donate, swap or give away when possible. The ARCC will not take rags, curtains, towels or blankets.

    • Fabric and textiles, bedding, linens, curtains, towels
  • Tyvek

    DuPont Tyvek is made of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). It is not paper, but can be recycled for use in a variety of new products, including plastic lumber for picnic tables, park benches, construction fencing and mud flaps. To recycle small quantities (less than 25 envelopes per month), turn any Tyvek envelope inside out, so the unprinted white surface shows on the outside. Stuff the inside-out Tyvek envelope with other used Tyvek envelopes for recycling.

    • Tyvek
  • Catalogs

    1) Contact companies and ask to be removed from mailing list if unwanted.

    2) Go to Catalog Choice (https://www.catalogchoice.org) and register for the catalogs you do and don’t want to receive.

    3) To remove your name from most national direct marketing lists, register online with the Direct Marketing Association’s (DMA) Mail Preference Service. OR, send a written request with your name and as it appears on all catalog labels and a $3 processing fee to: DMAchoice, Data & Marketing Association P.O. Box 643, Carmel, NY 10512

    • Catalogs
    • Junk mail
    • Magazines
  • Black plastic

     

    Black plastics are not recyclable in Vermont. If the item contains or is made with black plastic, it must be placed in the trash.

    • CD covers, jewel cases
    • Flower pots, plant pots, plastic (non-black)
  • Drywall

    Drywall (if clean, unpainted and reusable) may be taken for reuse by ReStore or ReSource. Call stores for details.

    • Sheetrock, drywall, and gypsum board
  • Tanglers

     

    Materials like wire, fabric, cords, and rope clog and tangle machinery at the recycling facility. Make sure to keep these kinds of items out of the blue bin.

    • Bike (bicycle) tires and tubes
    • Clothing
    • Cords, cables, adaptors, and electrical wires
    • Fabric and textiles, bedding, linens, curtains, towels
    • Holiday string lights, Christmas lights
    • Instrument strings
    • Packing materials: air pillows, bubble wrap
    • Phones, landline
    • Plastic bags, stretchy plastic film
    • Rags (clean ripped, torn, stained, unusable clothing & textiles)
    • Rags, oily
    • Tyvek
    • Wire
  • Rinse your Recyclables

    Rinse Recycling

    Before putting your recyclables in the bin, rinse off food residue. The people who sort your recyclables will appreciate not having to deal with stuck-on old food residue and the critters it attracts!

    • Aluminum cans, pie plates, and foil
    • Glass bottles and Jars, Unbroken
    • Metal cans
    • Plastic bottles and jugs
    • Plastic containers, bottles, and jugs (non-black)
    • Steel cans
  • Broken fluorescent bulbs and CFLs

    Fluorescent lamps contain mercury (Hg), which can escape and poison people and wildlife. If a fluorescent or CFL bulb breaks, follow these cleanup instructions from the Vermont Department of Health:

    • DO NOT VACUUM OR SWEEP up the broken lamp, as this may spread any mercury vapor that is present to other rooms. Keep all people and pets away from the breakage area.
    • Ventilate the room by closing all interior doors and vents, opening windows and any exterior doors in the room and leaving the room (restrict access) for at least 15 minutes.
    • Remove all materials you can, and don’t use a vacuum cleaner.
      • Wear disposable gloves if available
      • Carefully scoop up the glass fragments and powder with a stiff paper or cardboard (such as playing cards or index cards)
      • Pick up any remaining small pieces of glass and powder using sticky tape (such as masking or duct tape)
      • Wipe the area clean with a damp paper towel or disposable wet wipe
    • Place all cleanup materials (cardboard, gloves, tape, etc.) into a glass or rigid container with a lid.
    • Wash your hands.
    • Leave windows in the affected room open as long as practical (weather permitting).

    Broken fluorescent bulbs may be disposed of at a Household Hazardous Waste Collection or Hazardous Waste Facility.

    • Broken fluorescent bulbs and CFLs
  • Lawn mowers, gas-powered

    In order to be recycled, gas-powered lawn mowers and other metal, gas-powered lawn equipment, must be drained of all fluids before being recycled at a metals recycler. CVSWMD’s Additional Recyclables Collection Center (ARCC) can help you recycle this item.

    • Lawn mower, gas powered, push mower (fluids drained)
  • Manage hazardous products containers

    Empty containers for hazardous products such as household cleaners, automotive fluids, pesticides, and herbicides should be placed in the trash (NOT recyclable). Use all of the product, do not rinse.

    If any amount of the original product remains in the container, bring to a Household Hazardous Waste Collection

    If you are unsure whether the product is hazardous, visit our What is Hazardous Waste page for examples.

    • Aerosol cans, empty, toxics
    • Hazardous product containers, empty
    • Oil & hazardous fluid containers, empty, (bleach bottles, cleaner bottles, pesticide containers, etc)
  • Hearing aids

    Before donating or disposing of hearing aids, remove batteries and recycle batteries. To find a battery recycling location near you, go here or to the CVSWMD ARCC.

    • Hearing aids, batteries removed
  • Vermont Prescription Drug Disposal

    Store your prescription medications in a locked medicine cabinet. 

    Prescription medications can be disposed of at a pharmacy or police station drop box. Find a map of drop off locations at the Vermont Department of Health website

    You can also request a pre-paid envelope from the Vermont Department of Health to mail back any unused medications. 

    • Medications, prescriptions, and pharmaceutical drugs and pills

Special Recycling

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) programs fund disposal programs for certain items. Vermont's EPR programs include batteries, fluorescent bulbs, paint, mercury-containing devices, and certain electronics. Learn more at the VT Department of Environmental Conservation website.

All of these items (except broken fluorescent bulbs) can be recycled at CVSWMD’s Additional Recyclable Collection Center (ARCC). Broken fluorescent bulbs should be brought to a Household Hazardous Waste Collection.

  • Batteries, household, automotive, lead acid (rechargeable and single-use, alkaline, lithium, button cell, car, etc.)
  • Cell phones
  • Computers, desktops, laptops, notebooks, and netbooks
  • Printers, desktop
  • Computer monitors, any type - CRTs, flat-panel, LCD, and plasma displays
  • Fluorescent and CFL bulbs, lamps and tubes
  • Mercury thermostats, unbroken
  • Paint and primers, stains (architectural), deck and concrete sealers, clear finishes (oil-based, latex, varnish, shellac), labelled in original cans
  • Televisions, TVs, CRTs, flat-panel, LCD, and plasma displays, tablets
  • Computer peripherals - mouse, keyboards, scanners, external hard drives, modems, routers, computer speakers
  • Light bulbs, fluorescent